God Re-Gifts

re·gift
/rēˈɡift/Submit
verb
gerund or present participle: regifting
give (a gift one has received) to someone else.

I’ve experienced six decades of Christmas giving. If I average 7 gifts a year, I’ve received close to 500 gifts. Great memories. I remember the Christmas where my wife and kids scraped together all their money and bought me a leather coat. After 15 years, I still wear that coat and it looks great (even though the zipper is held together by paper clips).

Imagine if I regift my leather coat and give it to my son and the next year he gives it back to me. The gift might turn into a nightmare.

Karen and I have given our kids hundreds of gifts throughout the years. Interestingly, the gift the kids look forward to each year isn’t something shiny and new but Karen’s holiday cooking. Even though it’s the same food each year, we can’t get enough of her breads, cookies, shrimp cocktail, cheeses and punch.
We eat thousands of times in the year, but we remember that meal.

In the New Testament, much of Jesus teaching is located between the bread and the cookies

John writes, “Beloved, let us love one another, because love is of God.” Regardless how deep you go into the Christian soil, you always come out with a shovel full of love. John adds, “In this way the love of God was revealed to us: God sent his only-begotten Son into the world so that we might have life through him.”

In Luke 11 and Matthew 7, Jesus explains why no dad or mom will give their children rocks or serpents in place of bread and fish. It’s because we are in the image of God. We are not wild animals where survival of the fittest reigns supreme. Every ounce of Good flows from God.

In Mark 6, Jesus sees the vast crowd that will one day be His body, the Church. Millions of people throughout the world will one day come to eat from our Saviour’s hand. When the hour of history is late and many shepherds (cf. even the 12 apostles) forget the power of God, Jesus invites us to reimagine life as it really is. Jesus is king over all the world and yet He is also our friend. Because God is our father, our neighbors are our brothers and sisters.

Even though His shepherds are required to teach many things, they are not to forget the main reason why Christ came to earth.

Love.

The Church experiences God’s love every week in the Eucharist. It is here God regifts His original gift on calvary so that every member of His body has the chance to eat the bread and blood of eternal life.

God regifts Himself every time we eat together at the family meal, pray, read the Bible, enjoy our neighbor’s company and especially when we receive the food of God in the Eucharist.

Author: gbradepp

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